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Is the Recession a good thing?

by wude72 on February 24, 2009

Think about this.  People are losing everything they have worked for and I ask if it is a good thing.

Well, maybe how we got what we have was the wrong way to get it.  Maybe we have to much, is a 3000 sqft house really what we need or a car that holds nine people?  Shouldn’t we just have what we need?

People are losing all this money in the stock market (they think). If you don’t sell, you don’t lose real money, it is just a paper loss.  They keep eating and living just fine, but worry about how much money is gone.  In time that money will probably come back.  In the mean time we will just keep on living.

The loss of ones house, how bad is that, one day another house will come along, then they will live in that one.  I don’t think that it’s that important, the memories live in our mind, not between four walls. There will be new neighbors to make friends with and many more block party’s to attend, just in a different place.

Cars are just something to get us places we can’t walk.  In the olden days people walked everywhere they needed to go, so should we just change where we need to go or ride the bus?  It can’t be that bad.  I think we will get used to whatever we need to, to get by.

If all of us look at this from a different view, like how much money we will save or how much easier life will be with out all of these material goods, maybe it is a good thing.

What do you think?

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  • http://simple2learn.blogspot.com/ rakesh

    nice way to look at things. but then not everyone can afford to think on such a higher plane. that’s life !!

  • http://simple2learn.blogspot.com rakesh

    nice way to look at things. but then not everyone can afford to think on such a higher plane. that’s life !!

  • http://pensiveblog.com/ wude72

    life is funny sometimes

  • http://pensiveblog.com wude72

    life is funny sometimes

  • http://www.bLaKtivist.com/ bLaKtivist

    It might be a good thing for overconsumers but it is devasting to the most impoverished in this nation.

    I think it is admirable to look at the recession in terms of the kind of “deep thinking” you promote on this blog, but I think one has to operate from a privileged space in order to think of it as a smart way of downsizing. For some, day to day life is an experience of being downsized because so many others take a larger than neccessary slice of the pie.

    And isn’t that what got us into this mess in the first place? I am all for financial solubility, but how much money does one really need to be comfortable? And once we are financially comfortable shouldn’t that comfort encourage us to be more efficient with it? And perhaps help others to learn how to generate that comfort? Especially since SO MANY in this world (not just the US) live in substandard conditions?

    Just a thought.

    bLaKtivist
    Krys

  • http://www.bLaKtivist.com bLaKtivist

    It might be a good thing for overconsumers but it is devasting to the most impoverished in this nation.

    I think it is admirable to look at the recession in terms of the kind of “deep thinking” you promote on this blog, but I think one has to operate from a privileged space in order to think of it as a smart way of downsizing. For some, day to day life is an experience of being downsized because so many others take a larger than neccessary slice of the pie.

    And isn’t that what got us into this mess in the first place? I am all for financial solubility, but how much money does one really need to be comfortable? And once we are financially comfortable shouldn’t that comfort encourage us to be more efficient with it? And perhaps help others to learn how to generate that comfort? Especially since SO MANY in this world (not just the US) live in substandard conditions?

    Just a thought.

    bLaKtivist
    Krys

  • http://pensiveblog.com/ wude72

    you have opened my eyes, thanks for bringing that to my attention.

  • http://pensiveblog.com wude72

    you have opened my eyes, thanks for bringing that to my attention.

  • Diligentdave

    Like those who knew they were probably going to die on 9/11(2001) [or ever, for that matter], when you shuck right down to the cob, you see what was/is really important to you. We come into this world naked. And, truly, we will take nothing with us (this time, not even our bodies of flesh and bone)!

    Being able to survive, period, becomes an issue eventually. I have the gut feeling (and I am writing this comment in June 2011), that we are (still) just at the beginning of the Greatest (Economic) Depression—and that it may last for DECADES (if it is ever superseded by much better times)! I know, that doesn’t sound optimistic. Well, I try both to be “positive”, but also realistic. If I tell you everything is okay, and a tsunami or a volcano or something else blow you away, what good was my ‘optimism’? Yes, I know too. On the other hand, if I get you fearful of those things, and they don’t happen—what good purpose did that ‘warning’ serve?

    Well, I look at the demographics of the world; and, though the world appears to be getting more and more people (which it is, at least for now), it won’t be that way but a few more decades—MAYBE! The “boomers”, of which I am one (now age 57) were born during an 18 year stretch that wasn’t necessarily a period of peak human fertility in the US. We maybe got up to 3.2 or so babies per woman per lifetime—which, admittedly, was higher than during the birth dearth that stretched way back from World War I to the end of World War II. In fact, I think that possibly the “baby boomer” generation may have been, in large part, the reason for the economic boom of the past 60 plus years!

    But, sadly, my generation (me excluded), did not have enough children. In fact, from the early 1970′s onward, white Americans have average between about 1.7 – 1.8 babies born per woman per lifetime. Exact replacement, which really doesn’t make for robust growth, neither for a population, nor for an economy, with our current mortality rates, would be between about 211 and 213 babies born per every 200 adults (or 100 women) per lifetime. The US is the closest to exact replacement of all nations with advanced economies. (Only Israel, and maybe  Saudi Arabia, have non-subreplacement human fertility levels (and, for Saudi Arabia, that is most likely the immigrant workers living there, and not the native Saudis, who are having all the kids)!

    Anyway, the situation is grim. Europe, even with Moslems having children, is imploding population-wise. They’re losing about 2 million people per year of around 550 million. Russia loses 3/4 million people net per year (the Russians have more abortions than live births). Japan has shrunk 6 to 7 million people in the last six years. Germany’s fertility rate is no higher than that of Greece, about 1.3 per woman per lifetime. It is only that they exported more ‘stuff’ while Greece imported more ‘stuff’.

    Within just 4 years from now (or in about 2015), China’s median age will be higher than that of the U.S. (and we are not ‘spring chickens’)!!! Even berated Mexico, has dropped from averaging over 6 children per woman down to around 2 children in the quickest time of any nation known ever! Without illegal immigrants (mostly Mexicans and Central American latinos), the US’s human fertility rate would be much lower, and our economic situation would be much worse! Now, we have tens of millions of Archie Bunkers running around (Tea Party’ers) wanting to “kick the ‘bums’ out”! I hope we don’t get what we wish for!

    Sure, the sun shines, and my wife and I have nine children (for anyone who wishes to deride us for our carbon footprint and supposed foolhardiness), and now 7 grandchildren. And life goes on, and much of it is good. But people starved during the Great Depression of the 1930′s, even in the US. And, this coming (economic) storm appears that it may make that ‘slump’ look inviting, in comparison!

    Like I said. I hope for the best. And, I also try to prepare for the worst!

    All I can say is— stock up (on food), brace yourselves mightily (emotionally, socially, and otherwise), and get ready for the ride of your life (or for your life)!!!

    — DMP

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